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What is a context of unity?

A unit always fits into a given context: focus on the contexts in which a unit is bought, produced and sold.

Cladie Olivier05/27/2020

A unit always fits into a given context: focus on the contexts in which a unit is bought, produced and sold.

Unit management in a purchasing context

The purchasing units are the units associated with the purchasing context, ie the procurement of an article.

Entering the purchase unit (s) of an item is to list all the packaging that will potentially be used in the procurement process for this item. It is also contextualizing these units with other elements such as supplier information, purchasing costs, a product code provided by the supplier, etc.

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For example:

Supplier “A” supplies the item Elle & Vire Thick Fresh Cream in 5L jars. The purchase unit and therefore the 5L jar of crème fraîche. This unit, associated with supplier “A” and price “X €”, represent the 3 components of the supply model. At the same time, supplier “B” supplies the same Elle & Vire thick Crème Fraîche in boxes of 4 x 2.5L jars. The purchasing unit is the box of 4 Elle & Vire jars which, together with supplier “B” and price “Y €”, forms a new supply combination.
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Unit management in a production context

The production units are the units associated with the production context, ie which will make it possible to use a product (article or recipe) when developing a recipe. Indeed, a recipe can consist of:

  • of articles (ingredients, packaging elements, various consumables, etc.)
  • or other recipes (which will then be considered as sub-recipes in this case)

Informing the production unit (s) of a product means listing all the formats that will potentially be used in the recipes with which this product is associated.

These can be units:

  • weight of an ingredient or a recipe (gram, kilogram, ...)
  • volume of an ingredient or a recipe (liter, deciliter, ...)
  • of pieces - or personalized unit - of an ingredient (ex: 1 tablespoon of 12g flour, 1 can of 500g cut pineapple, etc.)
  • of “recipe”, in the proportions in which it was entered in the tool when creating a new recipe
  • of portion of recipe, such as these were defined during portioning, when creating a recipe (=> Reference article “Create a new recipe”)

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For example:
The preparation of the recipe for the apricot tart requires:

  • 1 shortcrust pastry recipe (unit = recipe)
  • 300 g of pie crust (unit = g of recipe)
  • and 10 apricots (unit = piece = 1 apricot)

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Unit management in a sales context

The sales units are the units associated with the sales context, ie which determine the packaging (s) in which a product (article or recipe) will be put on sale. This concerns:

  • items, which are offered for sale without having been transformed (e.g. drinks)
  • or recipes

Again, these can be units:

In a context of bulk sales ...

  • weight of an ingredient or a recipe (gram, kilogram, ...)
  • volume of an ingredient or a recipe (liter, deciliter, ...)

In a context of piecework sales ...

  • pieces of one ingredient (ex: 1 crate of 10 kg of apples, 1 box of 20 crates of 250 g of raspberries, etc.)
  • of “recipe”, in the proportions in which it was entered in the tool when creating a new recipe
  • portion of recipe, as defined during portioning, when creating a recipe 

=> See articles “Create a new recipe ”

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For example:
A pastry shop that bakes cakes is likely to sell them by part or by the whole cake.

The first unit of sale is the 150g piece of cake

The second unit of sale is the whole cake 

On each of these two units can be applied a sale price which has a different impact on the product margin.
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